Lorrie
lwood
..::.:

September 2012
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Lorrie [userpic]
Candles: Further Observations

The 66/33 candle (D from the previous post) self-extinguished overnight, as it had in the past.

The others all looked fine this morning, but by now, not quite twenty-four hours in, the 80/20 candle (C) is starting to labor: all the same symptoms as D had on its way out, only coming on much more slowly: smaller/dimmer/redder flame with some soot from incompletely burned fuel collecting on the glass, so I suspect it will self-extinguish before it exhausts all available fuel. Therefore, latzoni, I wouldn't recommend this to you. 8-)

The 90/10 candle (B) looks completely normal, until you compare it to its neighbor, the 100% beeswax (A). Then, and only then, can one observe a slightly smaller and dimmer flame, but it's not laboring or smoking like C.

A and Z are zipping along cheerfully--both flames have large, bright tongues and show every indication of normal fuel consumption. As yet, neither glass has shown any signs of breakage. However, the paraffin I broke in the past didn't crack until it was well past halfway through its burn; that's likely when the beeswax will break its glass, if it does.

Dangit, I wish someone made borosilicate glass in an acceptable cylinder--then it would be full beeswax ahead, and Maxwell's daemon take the hindmost!

-- Lorrie

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Comments

The size (weight) of the wick also has an influence on whether a candle (votive or container) essentially drowns it's own wick, thus extinguishing itself. Assuming all cotton, a fatter wick has a larger circle of melted wax around it, but burns faster. The material of the wick apparently has an influence too, as well as the wax composition.

Oh, and why not look at places like CandleChem or even various lab supply houses? Beaker candles, anyone?

Edited at 2010-01-31 05:47 am (UTC)